Program

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Wednesday 3rd Thursay 4th Friday 5th
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. MEETING WITH RUGGERO RAIMONDI 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. ISABEL PUENTE Accompanying the lyric being… 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. ELENA PARTENE La formation mélodieuse de l’âme: musique et éthique en philosophie grecque
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.TOMAS MARCO Voice, scream, music, word… 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. JAVIER ECHEVERRÍA Silences in chorus 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MARICARMEN GÓMEZ MUNTANÉ Chanter m’estuet: the marriage of music and word throughout the Middle Ages

12:15 p.m. – 01:15 p.m. GOTZON ARRIZABALAGA The lyric being: a journey
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. JOSÉ MARÍA SÁNCHEZ–VERDÚ The Voice and the world 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. FRANCISCO JARAUTA «Josefine the singer or The mouse folk» (On the centenary of Kafka) 01:15h p.m. – 02:15 p.m. VÍCTOR GÓMEZ PIN Ex linguae versus expression of nature: the matrix of singing

Wednesday 3rd

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10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. MEETING WITH RUGGERO RAIMONDI

He is and has been the most important figure in bel canto in the last half century within his vocal spectrum. He is recognized, in addition to his natural vocal gifts, for his enormous versatility and technical wisdom, which have allowed him to embody the ideal of more than one classic character in musical drama.


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11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.TOMAS MARCO

Voice, scream, music, word…

The voice as a communicative vocal emission. The voice as ritual (music) and the voice as language (communication). The emergence of articulated language in a musical context.

Influence on a first mixed language. The artistic voice as a sung word. First lyrics and first theater. The individual and collective voice, the choir.

The long and tortuous career of music associated with the word. Singing between phonology and concept. The problem of intelligibility.

Singing, word, expression, and concept in new historical musics and their current projection. From the voice as a communicative element to the voice as an instrument. Round trip.


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12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. JOSÉ MARÍA SÁNCHEZ–VERDÚ

The Voice and the world

The voice, as the profound and intimate expression of man, his languages, cultures, and origins, offers an enormously rich horizon of perspectives. Even more so if we depart from the Western world towards other cultures, or if we delve into the paths of contemporary creation. Allowing ourselves to be surprised by these multiple expressions of the human voice is the objective of this talk, with musical examples that embrace not only new languages in our culture, but also the field of ethnomusicology.


Thursday 4th

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10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. ISABEL PUENTE

Accompanying the lyric being…

It could be said that it is practically inconceivable to have a singer without their pianist, with whom they form an indissoluble team of work and interpretation. The vocal accompanist pianist specializes throughout their life in a very specific area that leads them to direct their musical and interpretative knowledge to the world of singing, not only through repertoire and style, but also through other learnings related to effective vocal practice, as well as the diction of different languages. Miguel Zanetti said that of the three staves included in a vocal score (the upper one for singing and the two lower ones for the piano), the one the pianist should master the most is the upper one. In this way, the singer facing the audience from the text and their voice can feel “accompanied,” that is, MAKING MUSIC in fullness with their pianist, achieving an almost symbiotic relationship that will reflect the work done in all cases.


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11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. JAVIER ECHEVERRÍA

Silences in chorus

Silence has been a major musical theme for many musicians (John Cage being a prime example) and also for poets, writers, philosophers, and music lovers in general. Understanding music as rationality, the issue of choral rationality will be addressed, exemplified in choirs of voices, but also of instruments and timbres: do violins “sing in chorus”?

Secondly, reflection will be made on the silences in written scores and on the marks and measures of silence.

In the third part, some choral musical silences will be analyzed, particularly the plural silences of performers and audiences.


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12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. FRANCISCO JARAUTA

«Josefine the singer or The mouse folk» (On the centenary of Kafka)

Franz Kafka died on June 3, 1924, at the Hoffmann Sanatorium in Kierling near Vienna. A long pulmonary illness had accompanied him, forcing him in the last months to retire to this clinic. Weakened in his final days, he could barely communicate with gestures and written messages. On the bed, a copy of “A Hunger Artist” published by Verlag Die Schmiede and the manuscript of his last story “Josefine the Singer,” which he corrected in those days and to which he added a second title: “The Mouse Folk.”

This is one of Kafka’s most emblematic stories. A place, a mining town in deep Bohemia that endures its difficult existence in a daily life marked by sordidness and sadness. But there is something that illuminates and changes their existence. In a small shack in the afternoons, Josefine sings. The lives of all revolve around her voice. For some, “il bel canto” would not exist if not for her, such is the enthusiasm and admiration for her voice. For others, her voice is rough, more scream than song, and they associated it with that “Schreie” or scream that the expressionists had defined as primitive. Both need her and come in the afternoons to that magical place where Josefine, with her voice, transcends the conditions of life.

One day, surprising everyone, Josefine disappeared. No one could understand it, and terror spread through every corner of the town. The unthinkable had happened, what no one could imagine. And it was compounded by uncertainty, not knowing why, how, where she could be found, and if she would ever return. Between impatience and collective hysteria, a new sadness had taken hold of everyone. Everything began to lose its meaning, and that relief of the afternoons in the shack where her voice illuminated the steps of life gave way to a kingdom of shadows embracing destiny. Kafka had once again drawn that illusion, the world of mirrors that replaced the real, announcing a difficult time of waiting. A wait that we can imagine, says Walter Benjamin, as possible, but not for us. Josefine, music or art, had abandoned them, leaving a trail of desolation, and her possible return in suspense.


Friday 5th

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10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. ELENA PARTENE

The Melodic Formation of the Soul: Music and Ethics in Greek Philosophy

Music played an important role in classical Greek philosophy, which from the beginning granted it a spiritual sense. In the Republic, it is the only discipline that occupies two places: initially, it serves as the foundation of the education of the guardians (alongside gymnastics) in Books II-III, and furthermore, it acquires the status of quintessential propaedeutic science in Book VII. This paradigmatic status even led Plato to say in the Phaedo that “philosophy is the highest music”, making music the standard-bearer of thought. At the same time, art was subjected to criticisms that would become famous, insisting that it was far from ideal. What is the special place of singing within this musical paradigm? If the voice is the primordial instrument of man, can we say that the immediacy and naturalness it implies would be a solution to save art from its mimetic destiny? Greek mythology says that the gods dislike the aulos because it distorts the features of the face and does not leave the mouth free, which is unable to sing, that is, to let the voice be heard. That is why Marsyas met a tragic fate, for not understanding that the lyre, which allows singing, is superior to the melody of the aulos. Perhaps it was this divine lesson that Plato had in mind when he said in Book III of the Republic that he preferred “Apollo and the instruments of Apollo to Marsyas and the instruments of Marsyas”. Singing is “the breath of reason”, or logos pneuma.


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11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. MARICARMEN GÓMEZ MUNTANÉ

Chanter m’estuet: the marriage of music and word throughout the Middle Ages

The nearly thousand years of history that we have agreed to call the Middle Ages witnessed some of the most radical changes in musical language. The desire to embellish the liturgy played a decisive role in this regard, stimulating the creativity of a collective whose formation revolved around texts that imparted a certain meaning to their lives.


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12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. GOTZON ARRIZABALAGA

The lyric being: a journey

In a journey that begins at the dawn of humanity and reaches Ruggero Raimondi’s singing, significant moments in the history of singing will be presented, accompanied by brief philosophical reflections that will point out the singularity of singing as an exclusive activity of the human being, beyond vague, hasty, and semantically confusing considerations with which the sound manifestations of different animals are considered, especially birds.


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01:15h a.m. – 02:15 a.m. VÍCTOR GÓMEZ PIN

Ex linguae versus expression of nature: the matrix of singing

It is common in music treatises to find the adjective “natural”: natural chord series; natural character of the harmonic series; natural progression of major thirds (to denote the Zarlino system); scale of natural fifths, etc. Sometimes, the term is merely a technical convention internal to musical vocabulary (such as when saying “tempered fifth” versus “natural” or Pythagorean fifth), but not always. Sometimes it seems as if one is speaking in conformity to a model set by that nature to which – for example – harmonics respond in physics.

In any case, music and particularly singing can never be characterized as natural in the mere sense of obedient to models of physics or even biology. Singing, as a paradigmatic modality of ex-linguistic music, implies a rupture of continuity with all types of communication that bear similarities to its acoustic image.